At the Orchard

Summer in the Orchard

Farming at Pietree is special for so many reasons. The beauty here is definetly one of them. These shots were taken this week by Patrick McDonald, our Orchardist's Assistant. Take a peak at what he gets to do and see everyday! 

Here Patrick takes a break to enjoy the mountains in the background while harvesting NOP Vista Belle Apples. 

Here Patrick takes a break to enjoy the mountains in the background while harvesting NOP Vista Belle Apples. 

Here is our biggest crop of Vista Belle Apples from the NOP side. We grow according to National Organic Protocol on one side of the orchard. This the first year we have had a crop of NOP Vista Belles worth bragging over! YAY! Samples available in the farmstand this week! 

Here is our biggest crop of Vista Belle Apples from the NOP side. We grow according to National Organic Protocol on one side of the orchard. This the first year we have had a crop of NOP Vista Belles worth bragging over! YAY! Samples available in the farmstand this week! 

A dove nest was found in a Cortland Tree. We chose to work around it- avoiding the area and not putting applications on the tree that could harm the birds. The birds successfully hatched and moved along yesterday. 

A dove nest was found in a Cortland Tree. We chose to work around it- avoiding the area and not putting applications on the tree that could harm the birds. The birds successfully hatched and moved along yesterday. 

The mother dove taking care of the babies. 

The mother dove taking care of the babies. 

A beautiful end to the day. 

A beautiful end to the day. 

Grafting? What is that?

Grafting is a technique used to change the variety of an apple tree by inserting a section of an apple (budding limb) limb into the stock of another tree.  The insert, or scion, then begins producing and the lower portion, or host, serves as it’s root system. This way we are able to use the root systems of undesirable varieties (sorry Red Delicious fans). This allows us to try some new, old or exciting apple varieties at the Orchard and determine those that are worth planting on a larger scale.

This process starts in February or March while the trees are still dormant. Our Orchardist braves the weather and heads out into the orchard to scout the trees for the perfect scion specimens. The scions are gathered and stored until late spring.

Once the bark on the apple trees starts slipping, typically mid-late spring, it is time to start grafting. We typically use two grafting techniques- the whip and tongue method and the bark graft method. 

We use the whip & tongue method when the wood is a year old and about the diameter of a pencil. We match the diameter of the host tree to the diameter of the scion. A tongue cut is made allowing the scion and the host to lock together.

Here we are finishing the whip cut on the host. 

Here we are finishing the whip cut on the host. 

Here we are adding the tongue cut to the whip. 

Here we are adding the tongue cut to the whip. 

Here we are matching the scion with the host

Here we are matching the scion with the host

Here the scion and the host are joined. 

Here the scion and the host are joined. 

Here the scion and the host are wrapped in an elastic strip to protect it and ensure bonding. 

Here the scion and the host are wrapped in an elastic strip to protect it and ensure bonding. 

Here are two finished whip and tongue grafts. 

Here are two finished whip and tongue grafts. 

Here is a successful whip and tongue graft from last year. Notice the distant line and color difference- that is where the scion and the host bonded. 

Here is a successful whip and tongue graft from last year. Notice the distant line and color difference- that is where the scion and the host bonded. 

We use the bark graft when the wood is older than a year or the diameter is larger than 3/8-1/2 of an inch. A portion or branch of the host is cut back and the scions are then placed snuggly inside the cut. Within 2-3 years the scions will begin producing apples with the host tree serving as it’s root system.

Here is a successful, year old bark graft. The scions are successfully bonded to the host and will be producing apples with in the next few years! 

Here is a successful, year old bark graft. The scions are successfully bonded to the host and will be producing apples with in the next few years! 

Grafting has allowed us to add 20 different varieties of apples onto trees that were once Red Delicious. Some of these are Heirloom varieties such as the Cox Orange Pippen, Esopus Spitzenburg and Reinette Simirenko. Others are newer, even experimental, such as the ME-8256. The ME 8256 was developed by Russell Bailey at the University of Maine in the ‘50s and offered to growers to try in their orchards. Our scions came from the orchards set out originally by Charley Fillibrown in Waterford. The ME 8256 doesn't have a name yet. We are looking forward to naming the ME 8256 here this Maine Apple Sunday, September 13, 2015! 




Apple Gingerbread

Preheat oven to 350 deg. F. Grease a 9x13” baking dish.

In a large bowl, whisk together 2 cups hot orange juice or apple cider, 1 cup unsulphured sweet molasses (not blackstrap), 1 cup pure maple syrup,  2/3 cup homemade applesauce,  ½ cup melted dairy or soy butter or safflower oil, 3 TB ground flaxseed,  and 1/3 cup water.  In a medium bowl, whisk together 4½ cups whole wheat flour (or 4 cups whole grain gluten free baking flour blend plus ½ cup amaranth flour plus ¾ tsp. xanthan gum),  3 tsp. baking soda, 2½ tsp. ground cinnamon, 2 tsp. ground ginger, 1 tsp. ground cloves, and ¾ tsp. salt. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and stir well to combine. Fold in 1/3 cup crystallized ginger diced into pieces about the size of a green shelling pea. Pour into pan and even out batter across pan. Sprinkle an additional 3 TB of pea-sized diced crystallized ginger over the top of the cake. Bake about 1 hour, until a cake tester inserted and removed can be removed cleanly. Allow cake to cool 15 minutes before serving. Enjoy!

 

Apple Gingerbread

Tastes delicious with a scoop of ice cream, and a little extra homemade applesauce on the side.